Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login
I love White Tigers by WishmasterAlchemist I love White Tigers by WishmasterAlchemist

White Tiger

Recessive colour mutation of the Bengal Tiger (Panthera tigris tigris)

Suggested by ~OctoberRainne

Adobe Photoshop CS4

Credits:

Original Stamp Template by $zilla774
White Tiger by dumbskull on Flickr Creative Commons



Similar Stamps:





How To Use:

On deviantART:

• simply copy and paste the Thumbcode where you want the stamp to be displayed. Have fun!

• If you use any of my stamps, a comment, fave, or Llama badge will be much appreciated.

• Detailed information on Stamp Requests and Commissions can be found HERE

Outside of deviantART / Derivative Works:

• you may use this stamp outside of deviantART and/or for Derivative Works ONLY if you are willing to comply with the below license requirements.

• If you misuse this stamp and redistribute it without fulfilling the license conditions, the CC license will terminate automatically upon violation: you will no longer have the right to continue using this stamp and may be liable for copyright infringement.

• Coding Tips for forum signatures and alike can be found HERE



This stamp is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)


This means that you are free to Share (copy, distribute, use) and to Remix (adapt, edit, create derivative works of) this stamp UNDER the following Conditions:
Attribution: You MUST attribute the work in the manner specified: credit me as WishmasterAlchemist with a link to my dA profile and to the original deviation.

NonCommercial: You may NOT use this work for commercial purposes.

Share Alike: This requires all derivative works to be licensed under the same (or a compatible) license as the original. If you alter, transform, or build upon this work, you may distribute the resulting work ONLY under the same or similar license to this one.

Add a Comment:
 
:iconmeztli72:
Meztli72 Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yayayyy!!! :yayay: - NaNoEmo 24/30 + Plz :funnydance: 
Reply
:iconneswolf20:
NESWolf20 Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2016
awesome
Reply
:iconkopalion:
KopaLion Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
used beacouse they are cutie :D
Reply
:iconlaviramoon:
Laviramoon Featured By Owner Nov 12, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
using <3
Reply
:iconmasterviki:
masterviki Featured By Owner Nov 10, 2015
Using ^^
Reply
:iconemiliaastorgac:
EmiliaAstorgaC Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Using!
Reply
:iconashstarkitty1400:
AshstarKitty1400 Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2015
They are beautiful, but they are unfortunately inbred :(
Reply
:iconsunnystar454567:
SunnyStar454567 Featured By Owner Edited Aug 16, 2014  Student Digital Artist
Heart  WHITE TIGERS

cuase they are best Heart 3D Heart Heart 3D Heart Heart 3D Heart Heart 3D Heart Heart 3D

heart pattern 19 19 19 :whitetigernoid: :whitetigernoid: :whitetigernoid: 
Reply
:iconflameheart10:
flameheart10 Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2014
Beautiful and epic! Keep on creating! :heart:
Reply
:iconfervious:
Fervious Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2014
I think you might be interested in how exactly white tigers come to be: bigcatrescue.org/abuse-issues/…

If you want to help out, I'd suggest removing the stamp.
Reply
:iconwishmasteralchemist:
WishmasterAlchemist Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
I wonder how many times I'll have to stress that this stamp was a request.
Reply
:iconfervious:
Fervious Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2014
How does that change anything? You could of said you would have to reject it because of x, y and z. 

Could you possibly add that information in the description? At least then, some people could be educated through the stamp.
Reply
:iconwishmasteralchemist:
WishmasterAlchemist Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
It changes that a requested stamp doesn't necessarily meet the personal opinions of the stamp maker that created it out of kindness, whereas people keep commenting as if it did.

I used to post a short piece of information about the animal species featured in my stamps and people kept complaining about the lenghty descriptions, so I gave up and removed them in the end. Something I've learnt is that you can't make everyone happy, no matter what you do.
Anyway, if you would like to suggest a short and effective paragraph about how awful the truth behind white tigers is - and I agree with you completely there - I'll make sure to add it to the description.

However, as for educating people through the stamp, I'm really sorry for what I'm going to write, but I doubt that because the truth is that people just don't read, which is proved by the questions I keep being asked about stuff that is clearly stated in the descriptions of my deviations, profile, or journals, be it what camera I take photos with, whether stamp requests are open or not, etc. and those would be very short sentences to read and very easy information to find out.

Still, adding a paragraph or two of text here won't harm anyone - although as I said people used to complain about the length of my descriptions - so go ahead and let me know your suggestion.
Reply
:iconfervious:
Fervious Featured By Owner Jun 19, 2014
Creating a stamp like this seems supports that you have no issue against white tigers, creating the image that you are indirectly support their treatment and breeding. When you look at how unethical the practices are involved, how could you look at one without feeling sad? I know I can't, that's why I try to get out there to educate the public so they can make their own decisions.

I'd rather you tried to help and educate those who do read. Isn't it better to try than not? As for the description, maybe short and sweet like "Be aware that no ethical zoo/sanctuary will breed white tigers because of severe inbreeding. If you want to learn more, here's some links-"
Reply
:iconcheliya:
Cheliya Featured By Owner Aug 4, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I feel like most people like how the white tiger looks, but hate how they are being created. It honestly is imo one of the most beautiful animals on earth... but their story is indeed so tragic. :(
Reply
:iconwishmasteralchemist:
WishmasterAlchemist Featured By Owner Jun 20, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
I like your phrasing. As for the links, there are plenty of interesting pages and articles about this matter. Do you know any that you would rank above the average?
Reply
:iconstonewhitetiger16:
StoneWhiteTiger16 Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
It says we can use this stamp, but I'd figured I would tell that I did. I hope that's okay.
Reply
:iconwishmasteralchemist:
WishmasterAlchemist Featured By Owner Mar 21, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
That's fine :nod: Since you're using it as your icon, it would be appreciated if you could write the credits somewhere on your profile.
Reply
:iconstonewhitetiger16:
StoneWhiteTiger16 Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Sure that's fine...
Reply
:icongrowlie26:
Growlie26 Featured By Owner Feb 28, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I love white tigers to.
Reply
:iconwingedwolfofhope:
WingedWolfofHope Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2014
I love white tigers! However, I do agree with Little-rolling-bean.

Anyways, this stamp is pretty neat though :).
Reply
:iconlittle-rolling-bean:
Little-rolling-bean Featured By Owner Feb 1, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
I love them too, but I hope you realize the cruelty behind white tigers. Please watch this short film about it: www.youtube.com/watch?v=UKwY7y…

The more white tigers we breed, the more tigers go to extinction. Support wild white tigers, not captive ones or breeding them. 

Know what is best for animals and not hurt them for human preference.

I for one prefer orange tigers.  
Reply
:iconkegger98:
Kegger98 Featured By Owner Oct 16, 2013
You mean you like albino lions?
Reply
:iconkittyloveramethyst:
KittyloverAmethyst Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
:love:I Love White Tigers:love:
Reply
:iconcottoncattailtoony:
CottonCatTailToony Featured By Owner Aug 30, 2013  Hobbyist Artist
I see that one when I was little.
Reply
:iconxaniko:
Xaniko Featured By Owner Jun 14, 2013  Hobbyist
Using! :3
Reply
:iconninjaweretiger:
NINJAWERETIGER Featured By Owner Jun 2, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Cool! I love white tigers!
Reply
:iconxxrekathedogxx:
xXRekaTheDogXx Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2013
for once i do not like a stamp >->'
80% of white tigers will be deformed if they are not already to deformed to survive
Reply
:iconmenollysagittaria:
MenollySagittaria Featured By Owner Mar 17, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I'd listen to GrandeChartreuse:

"The leucism gene is double-recessive. Both animals need to possess a copy to pass it on to their offspring. The white mutation does not occur in the wild--Mohan is the only wild-born example known. Any captive tiger that possesses the gene is a direct descendant of Mohan. White cubs require inbreeding to be produced. That's simple genetics.

Because captive populations are just that--captive--the studbooks have to be carefully maintained to prevent ANY amount of inbreeding. That's simply animal husbandry.

The leucism gene is also linked to cranial and occular deformities that cause seizures, crossed-eyes, and mental retardation. White cubs have a much higher infant mortality rate from both health issues and rejection by their mothers. Because Mohan was a Bengal tiger, his white offspring have been used in species and sub-species crosses that further pollute gene pools and make them useless for conservation efforts (because of compromised pedigrees and compromised genetic health).

The Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) no longer grants certification to any zoo or park that purposefully breeds white tigers (or king cheetahs, for the same reasons). They're a money-making scam aimed at the ignorant public, and the animals are the ones that suffer. The assertion that the white gene is not rare in captive populations is--if true--a bad thing."

By encouraging putting white tigers on a pedestal, you are feeding an interest for tigers than ultimately harm the species and conservation efforts.
Reply
:iconescapeingrunaway:
EscapeingRunaway Featured By Owner Mar 26, 2013  Student Writer
I thought it was just albinism which is rather harmless genetic mutation.
Reply
:iconxxrekathedogxx:
xXRekaTheDogXx Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2013
no albinos would be 100% white no stripes at all
Reply
:iconmenollysagittaria:
MenollySagittaria Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Nope. Albinos would have no stripes. According to Wikipedia:

"However, we do have a report of true albinism: in 1922, two pink-eyed albino cubs were shot along with their mother at Mica Camp, Tisri, in the Cooch Behar district, according to Victor N. Narayan in a "Miscellaneous Note" in the Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society. The albinos were described as sickly-looking sub-adults, with extended necks and pink eyes."

So it sounds like albinos carry very poor genetics as well in the case of tigers. Housecats that are white with blue eyes are extremely prone to deafness, too.
Reply
:iconwishmasteralchemist:
WishmasterAlchemist Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
What many people fail to notice is that many of my stamps have been done as requests for other deviants in the first place, so they don't necessarily mirror my likings/opinions/ideas...

I personally don't support the inbreeding of any animal species for "beauty" or money purposes, especially when inbreeding is known to compromise health, deteriorate the genetic pool, and increase the number of birth defects.
(This is done with purebred - overly purebred I'd say - dogs and cats under our nose: inbreeding to obtain (the sick idea of) a perfect animal may lead to serious health issues, and still many people are ready to pay absurd prices for them.)

Going back to white tigers, now I wonder, what should we do with all the existing white tigers? Euthanize them all?

I humbly see this stamp more as a "love sharer" for the existing white tigers, rathen an encouragement to breed more.
Reply
:iconmenollysagittaria:
MenollySagittaria Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
But you're still providing a means of people promoting their particular fascination with white tigers.

In the case of manmade breeds, I think breeding to keep a line "pure" does much more damage than crossbreeding. Harmful recessive alleles come out, and inbreeding is more likely. I think breeds with high incidents of problems should be stripped of their official recognition as a breed and reabsorbed back into the population or sterilized, such as some spaniels with neurological disorders. There's absolutely no reason to preserve that particular pretty "morph" while chancing suffering like that.

Euthanize? Only if the zoos want to. But castration should be mandatory, at least. Spaying is a lot trickier, so I'd just say don't let them breed.

Loving the white tigers that exist very heavily implies that you want them to keep on existing. Maybe at least you could put something about their harmfulness in your Artist's comments? It's the least you could do without actually animating a cautionary message on the stamp.
Reply
:iconthearawyn:
TheArawyn Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2013
Cool!
Reply
:iconask-lloyd-walker:
Ask-Lloyd-Walker Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012  Student Artist
i used it on my profile ;)
Reply
:iconwhitetiger11:
whitetiger11 Featured By Owner Oct 11, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yeh dude!!!!! Thats awsome!!!! :airborne: :airborne:
Reply
:iconcandywolf27:
candywolf27 Featured By Owner Oct 4, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
aw :( i feel bad for white tigers those poor things are inbred and have serious heath problems :(
Reply
:iconsplashstorm04:
Splashstorm04 Featured By Owner Mar 16, 2013  Hobbyist Artist
All that stuff is just myth. The Mohan bloodline was inbred, but in the 50 years since there has been many new outcrossings, so much so that the white gene is no longer rare in captive tigers. Big Cat Rescue is a corrupt sanctuary that has been investigated, and they aren't all they seem, so I'd be wary of them.
Reply
:iconxxrekathedogxx:
xXRekaTheDogXx Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2013
The white gene is a double-recessive one caused mostly by inbreeding (in a natural mating, there is only a one in 10,000 chance that a tiger will be white), which is why they say that it exists ‘only in captivity’. Zoos are not willing to wait for this one in 10,000 miracle tiger, and so find that the only other way to produce them is through inbreeding.
[link]
enjoy read all about it there.
Reply
:icongrandechartreuse:
GrandeChartreuse Featured By Owner Mar 16, 2013
That's scientifically inaccurate. The leucism gene is double-recessive. Both animals need to possess a copy to pass it on to their offspring. The white mutation does not occur in the wild--Mohan is the only wild-born example known. Any captive tiger that possesses the gene is a direct descendant of Mohan. White cubs require inbreeding to be produced. That's simple genetics.

Because captive populations are just that--captive--the studbooks have to be carefully maintained to prevent ANY amount of inbreeding. That's simply animal husbandry.

The leucism gene is also linked to cranial and occular deformities that cause seizures, crossed-eyes, and mental retardation. White cubs have a much higher infant mortality rate from both health issues and rejection by their mothers. Because Mohan was a Bengal tiger, his white offspring have been used in species and sub-species crosses that further pollute gene pools and make them useless for conservation efforts (because of compromised pedigrees and compromised genetic health).

The Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) no longer grants certification to any zoo or park that purposefully breeds white tigers (or king cheetahs, for the same reasons). They're a money-making scam aimed at the ignorant public, and the animals are the ones that suffer. The assertion that the white gene is not rare in captive populations is--if true--a bad thing.
Reply
:iconsplashstorm04:
Splashstorm04 Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2013  Hobbyist Artist
White tigers and leucism are two different things. Mohan was also not the only white tiger ever found in the wild. Please read the below:

"Indeed, the earliest known record dates back to 1561, when the Mogul emperor Akbar slayed a tigress that attacked his royal cavalcade near Gwalior. Two paintings dating from his reign and depicting this scene exist – appearing in his great work, Akbar Nama; one of these reveals that two of the tigress's cubs were white.

In The Royal Natural History (1894-1896), Dr Richard Lydekker recorded a white tiger shot in Upper Assam during March 1889, and in 1891 one was reported from Poona. Pollock and Thom listed several white tigers in 1900 from Burma and the Jynteah hills of Meghalaya; and Indian wildlife researcher Dr E.P. Gee documented the sighting of two specimens (one of which was later shot) towards the onset of the 20th Century at an Assam tea estate - renamed Bogobagh ('White Tiger') tea estate afterwards.

Between 1907 and 1933, the Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society included no less than 17 reports of shot white tigers, including one in the Dhenkanal State, Orissa, in 1909; another during 1910 in the Bilaspur district of what was then called the Central Provinces; and two in the district of Bhagalpur in Bihar sometime around 1926. More were shot during the 1920s and 1930s, including 15 in Bihar alone! On 22 January 1939, a specimen was killed by the Nepalese prime minister at Barda camp in Terai Nepal.

Some time before World War I, several white tigers frequented the area of jungle where the districts of Mandla and Bilaspur border on Rewa. In December 1915, one of these (a two-year-old male) was captured near Sohagpur, by the Maharajah Gulab Singh of Rewa. He exhibited it at his summer palace for the next five years, until its death, whereupon it was stuffed and presented to King George V. During later years, eight white tigers were shot in the Rewa forests, the last of which, a male, was bagged by the new Maharajah in 1947.

Disturbingly (though not unexpectedly, in view of such deplorable depletion), sightings of white tigers in the wild within more recent times have been few and far between. Indeed, the last confirmed individual on record appears to have been spied (and, yet again, shot!) in 1958 near Hazaribagh, Bihar, and its skin was displayed at a Calcutta taxidermist's shop. Fortunately, however, not all white tigers shared this tragic fate, and it is the history of one of these lucky few that explains why white tigers still exist today.

On 27 May 1951, a male white tiger was captured alive in Rewa, and was housed within the now-disused summer palace of the Maharajah. This specimen was the famous Mohan, sire of the pure strain of white Bengal tigers subsequently exhibited in zoos ands circuses all over the world. Mohan was mated with many different tigers, all normal-coloured at first, from which only normal-coloured offspring were produced. However, when one of these was itself mated with Mohan, white tiger cubs were at last obtained, and the strain has thrived ever since, with new tigers introduced intermittently in order to strengthen and perpetuate the line. (Moreover, white tigers have also appeared spontaneously in other captive tiger lineages elsewhere, showing that the genetic basis for white tigers is more widely distributed through the world tiger population than once assumed.)

This captive-breeding programme was studied in depth by Hong Kong University zoologists Drs Ian W.B. Thornton and K.K. Yeung, together with Dr K.S. Sankhala from Delhi Zoological Park, and in 1967 the trio published a Journal of Zoology paper. In it, they proposed that the white tiger form was caused by a recessive mutant allele when present homozygously (i.e. represented by two copies, as opposed to just one, or none at all). Further studies by Thornton (by then residing at La Trobe University in Victoria, Australia) into the inheritance of the white phenotype (coat appearance) in tigers confirmed this (Journal of Zoology, 1978).

Thornton's studies had verified that white tigers mated with white tigers can only produce white tigers, whereas normal tigers mated with normal tigers usually produce only normal tigers but can occasionally produce white tigers too. Consequently, it is clear that whichever allele is responsible for white tigers, it is both homozygous and recessive. Consequently, the white phenotype in tigers is inherited as a recessive trait. How, therefore, can the combination of the dominant inhibitor allele of the Inhibitor of Colour gene and the dominant agouti allele of the Agouti gene, responsible for the dominant chinchilla phenotype in domestic cats, also be responsible for the recessive white phenotype in tigers?

As discussed earlier, a major problem when investigating the likely genetic scenarios of coat phenotypes in wild cat species is that far fewer studies have been conducted upon such felids than is the case with the domestic cat. This has resulted in the usage of some very loose, non-precise genetic terminology in relation to wild cats – to the extent that totally separate alleles or genes that happen to induce the same phenotype (regardless of whether they are recessive or dominant) are often referred to by the same general name (e.g. 'inhibitor gene'), which obviously can – and does - cause confusion. In contrast, the genetics of the domestic cat has been studied so intensely that many of the alleles and genes responsible for coat phenotype and their respective chromosomal loci have been precisely identified, enabling a series of precise, universally-agreed genetic names to be applied.

In their papers on white tiger genetics, Thornton and colleagues refrained from referring to the recessive allele responsible for the white phenotype as an Inhibitor of Colour allele, a Full Colour allele, or, indeed, an allele of any named gene. Instead, they merely labelled it as w and recessive, and labelled the allele responsible for the wild-type phenotype as W and dominant – which was certainly the wisest, most satisfactory decision in the absence of confirmed data as to which specific locus this recessive allele's gene occupies.

Interestingly, there is a recessive mutant allele of the Full Colour gene that does produce blue-eyed albinos in domestic cats. However, the coat of such animals is entirely white, with no dark markings of any kind. Hence this allele cannot be responsible for white tigers, as their coat is patterned with black, grey, or brown stripes. Equally, the Dominant White gene, responsible for many blue-eyed white domestic cats, cannot be responsible for white tigers (or lions), because, as its name suggests, genetically it is dominant, not recessive.

Muddying the waters even further, some workers refer to white tigers as leucistic. Yet leucism is a wholly separate condition from any of the scenarios considered above, because it involves not merely the absence of pigment but the absence of pigment cells (see earlier)." Source: [link]
Reply
:icontaylorswift67:
Taylorswift67 Featured By Owner Jul 10, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Awesome
Reply
:iconlight356:
Light356 Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2012
Can I use it to my ID?
Reply
:iconwishmasteralchemist:
WishmasterAlchemist Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Yes, simply copy and paste the thumb code ;D
Reply
:iconlight356:
Light356 Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2012
ok thanks! :D
Reply
:iconambercream:
AmberCream Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2012  Hobbyist Interface Designer
what do u use stamps from the internet for?
Reply
:iconwishmasteralchemist:
WishmasterAlchemist Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
dA stamps are to be displayed on profiles, journals, custom boxes... basically on any dA page that allows the thumb-sharing feature. Some deviants also hoard them in huge collections XD
In general, their "purpose" is to tell something about you: something you like or dislike, something you think, something you agree or disagree with and so on...
Reply
:iconambercream:
AmberCream Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2012  Hobbyist Interface Designer
how do i use it on a journal?
Reply
Add a Comment:
 
×




Details

Submitted on
August 5, 2010
Image Size
13.6 KB
Resolution
99×56
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
9,275 (1 today)
Favourites
1,619 (who?)
Comments
73

License

Creative Commons License
Some rights reserved. This work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.
×